janiiit:

standwithpalestine:

Remember Ismael Mohamed Bakr, 9, Ahed Atef Bakr, 10, Zakaria Ahed Bakr, 10 and Mohamed Ramez Bakr, 11 - all from the same family - whose crime was nothing more than be Palestinian.

It does not matter how young you are, if you are Palestinian, Israel will kill you. A day which started out playing football on the beach ended with these children in body bags.

Will any Israeli be held responsible for their murder? Of course not. You’ll hear how Israel was only ‘defending’ itself and some nonsense about how Hamas was ‘hiding’ in the football they were playing with.

Israel will make something up (or pretend they’ll ‘investigate’ the incident - no outsiders allowed in that process, though!) and world leaders like Obama will regurgitate it.

While we’re on the topic of Obama, remember how he made a statement about the three Israeli settlers? It was a sweet thing to do. As of July 16, 209 Palestinians have been killed by Israel in their latest assault on the civilians of Gaza, at least 39 of whom are children.

You’re more likely to see your great-grandchildren graduate or hell freeze over than hear a word from him on Palestinian children or criticising Israel’s war crimes.

SIGNAL FUCKING BOOST

(Source: standwithpalestine, via susiethemoderator)

"Gaza was bombarded with 273 airstrikes yesterday (8th July). That’s an average of 11 an hour. Gaza is about 25 miles long and 4 miles wide, with a population of 1.7 million crammed into that tiny space. It is under Israeli occupation and Israeli siege. Hospitals estimate they will run out of resources to treat the wounded in about two days. Electricity is intermittent. Gaza has no army, air force or navy. Israel is the fourth largest military power in the world. Resistance to occupation is allowed under international law. Israel’s occupation, siege and collective punishment of Gaza is not."

Palestine Solidarity Campaign UK (via america-wakiewakie)

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

"She loves her coconut oil, shea butter, black soap, olive oil, natural hair, saggy clothes, long dresses, hair wraps, twist outs, lemon water, green tea, grapes, sunflowers, friends, family, and future.
What’s a label? She doesn’t have one"

A carefree black girl (via thedappledsky)

(Source: soulgeneration, via anomaly1)

"So many people glorify and romanticize “busy”. I do not. I value purpose. I believe in resting in reason and moving in passion. If you’re always busy/moving, you will miss important details. I like the mountain. Still, but when it moves lands shift and earth quakes."

Joseph Cook (via aurelle)

Something I need to learn to love.

(via sterlingsea)

(Source: jnc-ink, via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

"

African-Americans avoiding eye contact has a history that goes back to slavery. It was socially unacceptable for a slave to make eye contact with a white man in the Antebellum South. Many whites back then felt if a Negro “eyeballed him” it was a sign that they thought they were equal to a white man and had no respect for him. In Jim Crow America, making eye contact was a social crime that could lead to a black person being lynched. And during the Civil Rights period and afterward, a black person could be arrested just for looking a police officer in the eyes.



Today African-Americans still regard making eye contact with a negative connotation even when interacting with each other. On the streets in inner city neighborhoods making eye contact is often seen as a sign of aggression and hostility. Any eye contact with a stranger in the ghetto can easily turn into an argument, escalate into a fight and lead up to murder. So many African-Americans, out of fear for their saftety, keep their eyes down and look away when they communicate with other brothers and sisters in the neighborhood….

These misunderstandings about nonverbal social cues have prevented African-Americans from getting jobs or keeping jobs, networking effectively in school, or socializing outside of the black community. Moreover it has prevented brothers and sisters from succeeding in the world of work. While social cues like eye contact and smiling are considered normal in White society, they can get someone killed in the inner-city."

Shawn James (via xuron)

This explains something I’ve been thinking about for quite a while

(via masteradept)

Mmmmhmmmmm

(via junkyardvarren)

Truth. I was raised to give good eye contact by my parents bc they knew this but my roomie hates it for this very reason and it’s hard to adjust or change. Especially when you don’t wanna look white devils in they eye lol.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

This. My mom specifically raised me to make eye contact with other black folks, because she said we were the only ones who could be counted on to acknowledge each other’s existence/worth, but it always stopped there, and while she said the opposite explicitly, I could always follow her cue when it came to making yourself less noticeable around white folks that weren’t vetted.

(via troubledsigh)

(Source: sisoula, via afrometaphysics)